Rhodes Health Sciences students learn to Stop the Bleed - Hometownstations.com-WLIO- Lima, OH News Weather Sports

Rhodes Health Sciences students learn to Stop the Bleed

A surprise mass attack simulation was sprung on them as part of a training program called Stop the Bleed. A surprise mass attack simulation was sprung on them as part of a training program called Stop the Bleed.
Each "victim" had a different injury that needed to be treated and students had to combine their knowledge to try and save the wounded. Each "victim" had a different injury that needed to be treated and students had to combine their knowledge to try and save the wounded.

It was an explosive day for Health Services students at Rhodes State College Friday, January 12, 2018 as they learned how to use their different skills to work together.

Students from the Division of Health Sciences at Rhodes State participated in an informational retreat where they had an unexpected deviation from their discussion. A surprise mass attack simulation was sprung on them as part of a training program called Stop the Bleed. E.M.S. program coordinator Jeb Sheidler says Stop the Bleed aims to train as many people as possible in how to aid those injured in a mass shooting or blast attack.

"As we've seen an increase in mass shooting events, we know that bystanders have a dramatic impact on caring for the patients that are injured in those events and the more people we can train, hopefully the more lives we can save," says Sheidler.

Each "victim" had a different injury that needed to be treated and students had to combine their knowledge to try and save the wounded. Assistant Dean of Health Sciences Angela Heaton says the goal was to teach students to consider other types of treatments than the ones they are used to.

"The whole kind of spotlight of the day is really to have all of those students come together, learn about other disciplines and how they're working together to treat that patient holistically," says Heaton.

Students earned a Stop the Bleed certification at the end of the course, but student Dana DeWitt of the Occupational Therapy Assistant Program says the biggest take away from the course is the advantage of working with others.

"I think that the benefit is actually learning to work with someone else and respecting what they know compared to what you know, and then just finding things that you can learn from each other," says DeWitt.
 

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