Westerville police deaths prove law enforcement dangers are ever - Hometownstations.com-WLIO- Lima, OH News Weather Sports

Westerville police deaths prove law enforcement dangers are everywhere

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Every time an officer responds to a call, they are unsure of what lies ahead. Every time an officer responds to a call, they are unsure of what lies ahead.
Allen County Sheriff Matt Treglia said hang up calls are some of the most common, but most difficult to deal with. Allen County Sheriff Matt Treglia said hang up calls are some of the most common, but most difficult to deal with.
Grigsby said its hard for a civilian to understand what an officer goes through on a call, without going through it themselves. Grigsby said its hard for a civilian to understand what an officer goes through on a call, without going through it themselves.

In the line of duty, police officers are faced with danger all over the country. On Saturday, two officers from Westerville, Ohio were killed responding to a 911 hang up call. Officers Anthony Morelli and Eric Joering responded to a possible domestic situation at a condominium complex. 54-year-old Morelli and 39-year-old Joering were shot at while responding to the call. The suspect, Quentin Smith, shot both officers but not before sustaining injuries himself. Joering died at the scene while Morelli died after being transported to a nearby hospital. 

Every time an officer responds to a call, they are unsure of what lies ahead.

"Dangers come in many forms," said Lieutenant Tim Grigsby of the Ohio State Patrol. "In most situations, officers are walking into situations that they don’t have all the variables. Be it a traffic stop, or some kind of incident at a residence or a business, there are always those dangers that are hidden or aren’t on the surface."

Allen County Sheriff Matt Treglia said hang up calls are some of the most common, but most difficult to deal with. 

"911 hang up calls, traffic stops we do them every day," Treglia said. "We do them constantly. We’re always talking to our officers about complacency and being very aware of their surroundings at all times. It’s very important because that one traffic stop or that one 911 hang up could be the call of a lifetime. The call that you’re going to show up on that’s really going to be a call where you might be fighting for your life."

Grigsby said its hard for a civilian to understand what an officer goes through on a call, without going through it themselves. That is how he and Treglia prepare their officers, through training. Both Grigsby and Treglia stress to their officers to be vigilant and to not get complacent.

"There's just a constant barrage of information flowing in and out and that’s a lot to take in," said Grigsby. "That’s why we spend so much time with our officers not just at the initial onset of their training, but also weekly, monthly, annually to make sure they are up on the current and most latest techniques."

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