University of Findlay remembering the 9/11 attacks - Hometownstations.com-WLIO- Lima, OH News Weather Sports

University of Findlay remembering the 9/11 attacks

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A special service was held outside the old main building, where a group gathered to spend a moment of silence together as well as share a prayer for the people affected by the attacks back in 2001. A special service was held outside the old main building, where a group gathered to spend a moment of silence together as well as share a prayer for the people affected by the attacks back in 2001.
As the years go by, seeing the younger generation taking part in memory of the attacks is a welcoming sight to those who remember. As the years go by, seeing the younger generation taking part in memory of the attacks is a welcoming sight to those who remember.
As people stood around the flagpole in remembrance of what happened on 9/11, they think back to their thoughts on the day it happened, and how it's affected their lives in the years that followed. As people stood around the flagpole in remembrance of what happened on 9/11, they think back to their thoughts on the day it happened, and how it's affected their lives in the years that followed.

The attacks on the World Trade Center nearly two decades ago is something that the world will not soon forget, and on the University of Findlay's campus, things were certainly no different.

A special service was held outside the old main building, where a group gathered to spend a moment of silence together as well as share a prayer for the people affected by the attacks back in 2001. Matt Ginter, Director of Christian Ministries at the University of Findlay, says that taking the time to stop and reflect is an important part of remembering what happened.

"If we don’t remember these things, if we don’t look back at God’s providence for us in the face of tragedy and suffering, we're prone to forget - so these are just essential things to remember and to remember corporately and in community like we were able to do today," Ginter said.

As people stood around the flagpole in remembrance of what happened on 9/11, they think back to their thoughts on the day it happened, and how it's affected their lives in the years that followed.

"In the back of my mind, my question was where was my mom, because my mom had a daycare school a couple of blocks from Ground Zero," said Sarah Fedirka, Asst. Professor of English at the University of Findlay. "She been evacuated to New Jersey with one child left to be picked up. We were very blessed during the whole thing, she was okay, and other friends and family that we had in New York were nowhere near the site of the trade towers. It’s a day that I will remember for as long as I live."

"I remember pretty clearly that everything is going to change - all of life is is going to change from that Tuesday morning," said Bill Reist, Ret. Pastor of the College First Church of God. "I’m a pastor and I see life through the sovereignty of God; how do we respond to tragedy in a more focused, creative way and not to succumb to evil."

As the years go by, seeing the younger generation taking part in memory of the attacks is a welcoming sight to those who remember.

"We have incoming freshman this year that were born in the year 2000, so they have no vivid recollection of the event, so to have things like this is just essential to keep the awareness in the forefront of the minds of those who wouldn’t remember the day itself," said Ginter.

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