Findlay breaks ground on Phase 1 of flood mitigation project - Hometownstations.com-WLIO- Lima, OH News Weather Sports

Findlay breaks ground on Phase 1 of flood mitigation project

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A groundbreaking ceremony held just north of the Norfolk Southern Railroad Bridge off of Cory St. signaled the start of the first phase of a project to help reduce flooding in the area. A groundbreaking ceremony held just north of the Norfolk Southern Railroad Bridge off of Cory St. signaled the start of the first phase of a project to help reduce flooding in the area.

The City of Findlay is ready to start a major project to reduce flooding in the area.

A groundbreaking ceremony held just north of the Norfolk Southern Railroad Bridge off of Cory St. signaled the start of the first phase of a project to help reduce flooding in the area.

"The biggest piece of this project is going to be the installation of a floodplain bench," said Derek Dalton, project manager at Stantec Consulting. "Basically lowering the top of a riverbank down to an elevation that will allow the river to expand into a gradually widening area as the flood waters come up.

The benches will be cut into a stretch of 3,500 ft between Broad Avenue and the Norfolk Southern Railroad Bridge. At its widest point, the river will be 450 feet wide and anywhere from two to 16 feet deeper. The changes will lower the velocity of the river and allow it to hold more water during flood events.

"What this will help with is when we get large rain events in Findlay, the base flood elevation is at a certain level, this will lower than 100-year flood by about a foot," says Mayor Lydia Mihalik. "For everyone whose ever had to clean up their basement or the first floor, for every business whose had to pick up the pieces, this is really a significant milestone in flood risk reduction in Findlay."

The work will take about 600 properties out of the floodplain, many of which are in the city limits. Economically, it makes Findlay more attractive to potential and current businesses.

"You take a look at the investments that we've had of Marathon downtown recently with their new headquarters, even companies on the north side," said Tim Mayle, Director for Hancock County Economic Development. "Being on the south, flooding [mitigation] is critical for us to continue to grow and be the community that we are."

Dirt is expected to start being moved in late October and will take about nine months to complete.

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