A good harvest could mean problems with storage down the road - Hometownstations.com-WLIO- Lima, OH News Weather Sports

A good harvest could mean problems with storage down the road

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It's that time of year once again - where farmers are taking to the fields and beginning their harvest, raking in all of the hard work that they've done throughout the year. It's that time of year once again - where farmers are taking to the fields and beginning their harvest, raking in all of the hard work that they've done throughout the year.
The big question is: with all of this crop being harvested, are farmers going to have an issue with where they store the excess crop? The big question is: with all of this crop being harvested, are farmers going to have an issue with where they store the excess crop?

It's that time of year once again - where farmers are taking to the fields and beginning their harvest, raking in all of the hard work that they've done throughout the year.

One of those local farmers is Karl Schlegel, who says that this year's harvest is one of the best that he's seen in years.

"Right now from what we have off, are going to be in the 70 bushel range, maybe a little more, and the corn is going to be one of the best - maybe not the best, but the corn we have now is running about 230 bushels an acre, and maybe more," Schlegel said.

And he's not the only one; according to Curtis Young with the Ohio State Van Wert County Extension Office, farmers around the area have had success this year, such as with soybeans - some farmers are seeing low yields around 10 to 15 bushels more than the average in Van Wert County. But the big question is: with all of this crop being harvested, are farmers going to have an issue with where they store the excess crop? Young says that that might be the case.

"The longer it sits outside on the ground, the greater potential for for the grain to begin to deteriorate, so we don’t like to see it sit outside for very long, especially if it’s not under any kind of cover, and unfortunately when that happens the elevators have to blend the slightly damaged corn with the corn that has been stored inside," said Young.

Young also pointed out a problem that corn farmers may have to deal with this year, including ear rot and stalk rot, meaning farmers will have to be on the lookout for potential problems in their fields.

"Fields should be checked, especially fields where we see a lot of ears staying up, pointing upwards," said Young. "As they dry, the ear husks open up more and every time it rains, we have more rain running down the interior of the cob - if it stays wet in there, it will just promote more mold growth."

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